Praise Whistlers Abroad
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Song 24 -- Be Still My Soul
http://praisewhistlers.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=2549
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Author:  Judy K [ Mon Oct 29, 2007 4:55 pm ]
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Thanks for the compliments, everyone.

Love the song choice this time around -- good job, Connie! :thumbsup:

Author:  Adrian [ Mon Oct 29, 2007 4:57 pm ]
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jrc wrote:
Played flawlessly
jrc


Thank you for your kind words of encouragement. They mean a lot coming from a master like you. However, at least three times I make a small coughing sound into the instrument. I need to learn to relax my throat when playing. I'll redo it later. If you have any tips then please give them as this coughing into whistles and flutes is a perennial problem of mine.

Author:  jrc [ Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:02 pm ]
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ConnieS wrote:
Judy has given us a dulcimer version of Be Still:

http://praisewhistlers.org/exchange/son ... _judyk.mp3

She says:

Quote:
There's a quick, barely tweaked version of Finlandia/Be Still My Soul done on the mountain dulcimer... I was 'noodling' with the tune and found that the basic melody and harmony could be played on the middle & bass string just keeping the fingers at the same fret spacing ... but the bass string squeaks when sliding between notes. Oh well -- It was fun to do so it's left as is. The second time through the song a mixture of two separate arrangements from Everything Dulcimer was used. Wish I had more time available to play with the song -- it's always been a favorite.


I don't know how I missed this! Great job JudyK!! The contrast of styles between you and RT10 (as he is now known) is also cool ...

More please!!!

jrc

Author:  ConnieS [ Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:43 pm ]
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Adrian wrote:
Finlandia is an emotive tune for me. I was brought up in the 1960s in a solitary house in some woods in Cornwall with my two sisters. We did not have electricity, running water, or gas for that matter, but what we did have was an old wind-up gramaphone that played 78 records. Out of the tweve or so records we owned was my mother's most treasued recording of Finlandia. We listened to it and the other 78s on special occasions. To this day I don't fully know why the tune always brought a tear to my mother's eye. She did tell us that it reiminded her of the terrible struggle the Finns made for survival against the Russians and the high price they paid for independance.

Finlandia also reminds me of a hymn we sing to that tune in England, "We rest of thee, our shield and our defender". This was the last hymn sung by the Auca five in Ecuador before they were killed by the Indians they came to minister to. Jim's wife, Elisabeth Elliot, named her book using the last line from that hymn, "Through gates of spendour". It was from reading this book in the summer of 1982 that i gave my life to serving God in missions.

A special tune for me!


Adrian, thanks for sharing all this. It explains why the tune is played so emotionally. Please don't over polish it. It's wonderful the way it is.

In the 80s I played in a praise band with Nate Saint's brother, Dan Saint. A very quiet, understated man. Because of that I always felt very close to the story of those martyrs. I did not know that hymn was sung to this tune. Knowing this connection makes the tune much more special than it already was.


As for the coughing, I'll bet it's a forced glottal stop. Maybe induced by phlegm irritating your throat, made more noticeable by the fact that you open things up quite a bit to play wind instruments. I've struggled with glot stops for years. If it's chronic it may be allergies. Can you get Loratadine (the active ingredient in Claritin) where you are? That product works well on my allergies and I haven't had trouble with the stops in years.

Author:  Shan [ Tue Oct 30, 2007 6:56 am ]
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Another round of cheers!

Ren - this sounds like something I would put in my girls' CD players for bedtime music. Just simple and lovely.

Judy - you make experimenting around with music sound like a good thing. I like the chords-- they add so much.

Adrian - wow, I'm glad I was sitting down to listen to this. Really amazing. I love it when somehow more than just notes come out of an instrument. A goal to aspire to!

Author:  Adrian [ Tue Oct 30, 2007 9:00 am ]
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Judy K wrote:
Adrian, that's wonderful! Absolutely love the ornaments you use -- they "fit".


Thank you. Itis nice to get a pat of the back from one of my heros.

Shan, thank you too for your kind comments.

Keith, thanks. I do need an Overton Low C but I have to get a low D first. I hope to have saved up enough for the low D for my 50th birthday in Feb. I'm quite fussy with my Overtons and it usually takes long fone calls with Colin Goldie and several months to get the right one in my hand.

Connie, thanks for the tip. I'm sure you are right. They do sell claratin here. I'll let you know how it goes.

Author:  Blackhawk [ Thu Nov 01, 2007 5:42 pm ]
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Man, you all have done real justice to this song! I can't seem to wrap my mind around it, but I've enjoyed all your versions.

Author:  Adrian [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 12:07 am ]
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Blackhawk wrote:
Man, you all have done real justice to this song! I can't seem to wrap my mind around it, but I've enjoyed all your versions.


Try it. It will sound great on your Humphrey or WW. It is a very nice tune and you don't have to add anything to make it sound good.

Author:  ConnieS [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 7:48 am ]
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All these versions are really good.

For sheer stress relief the last few days, I've put Adrian's version on my desktop so I can go to it and regain perspective.

Unfortunately, because of this, my playing of this song is getting to be like a bad shadow-clone of Adrian's. So I may not post, but I have enjoyed all. :D

Author:  Blackhawk [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 7:52 am ]
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Adrian wrote:
Blackhawk wrote:
Man, you all have done real justice to this song! I can't seem to wrap my mind around it, but I've enjoyed all your versions.


Try it. It will sound great on your Humphrey or WW. It is a very nice tune and you don't have to add anything to make it sound good.
I've been working on it, but it just sounds lifeless the way I play it, and I can't seem to put life into it the way you all do. Ah well.

Author:  khl [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 12:47 pm ]
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Connie and Blackhawk,

Please post, despite your hesitations. TPE will have lost its purpose if everybody stops posting once a really good version (like JRC's or Adrian's) shows up. Please.

Author:  jrc [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 1:10 pm ]
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Blackhawk wrote:
Adrian wrote:
Blackhawk wrote:
Man, you all have done real justice to this song! I can't seem to wrap my mind around it, but I've enjoyed all your versions.


Try it. It will sound great on your Humphrey or WW. It is a very nice tune and you don't have to add anything to make it sound good.
I've been working on it, but it just sounds lifeless the way I play it, and I can't seem to put life into it the way you all do. Ah well.


You're exactly what He wanted when He made you ... just play.

Don't be so critcal of yourself ...

Author:  Blackhawk [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 2:01 pm ]
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jrc wrote:
Blackhawk wrote:
Adrian wrote:
Blackhawk wrote:
Man, you all have done real justice to this song! I can't seem to wrap my mind around it, but I've enjoyed all your versions.


Try it. It will sound great on your Humphrey or WW. It is a very nice tune and you don't have to add anything to make it sound good.
I've been working on it, but it just sounds lifeless the way I play it, and I can't seem to put life into it the way you all do. Ah well.


You're exactly what He wanted when He made you ... just play.

Don't be so critcal of yourself ...
Thank you, jrc. I think the reason I'm critical of my playing is that I've been trying to go back and record some of the ones I missed before. I've been working on, and have recorded the Lord is My Shepherd. I like the way it sounds, but it doesn't follow the timing of the sheet music as written, and I can't seem to get it any better. I had my son listen to the recording and read the sheet music as he listened and when it was done he said I shouldn't post it. He's supportive of my playing but he knows I'd rather not make a fool of myself by posting something that's not acceptable, so I appreciate his advice. And I did a better job on that one than on this one, thus my reluctance to record it.

Author:  jrc [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 2:08 pm ]
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I don't know if it works for you, but I almost ALWAYS record to a click track, especially if I'm doing a background part like keys or guitar.

You can't do that with an open mic though - I use headphones. You don't want to record the click so it's audible on the keeper track. If you can't do that try playing with the click before you record. Just an idea ... sometimes a more loose/free rhythm is OK, just depends on the song. Even then though, I'd rather have a slow click. Just my opinion ...

What does you son play? Get him to play with you?

Quote:
I like the way it sounds,


That's all that matters ... loose the chart ... just play :mrgreen: !

Author:  Blackhawk [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 5:10 pm ]
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jrc wrote:
I don't know if it works for you, but I almost ALWAYS record to a click track, especially if I'm doing a background part like keys or guitar.

You can't do that with an open mic though - I use headphones. You don't want to record the click so it's audible on the keeper track. If you can't do that try playing with the click before you record. Just an idea ... sometimes a more loose/free rhythm is OK, just depends on the song. Even then though, I'd rather have a slow click. Just my opinion ...
That's a good idea, Jim. I'll have to learn to use it sooner or later, and it might as well be sooner.

Quote:
What does you son play? Get him to play with you?
He plays the big stand up bass in the San Jose State orchestra, so his bass is always at the university. It's too big to lug back and forth between condo and school. Otherwise, that'd be a great idea. :)

Author:  Adrian [ Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:57 pm ]
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Darvis

One of the really good tools for musicians is a metronome. It will help you whether your read music or not. It develops and refines an inner sense of timing. Even the best musicians train with them, classical, jazz and rock.

Don't start using them to play tunes along to as that can be confusing and discouraging. Each day turn it on and just tap your foot to the beat for a minute or so. Then change the speed and tap again for a minute or so. In just a few weeks your sense of keeping a beat will be vastly improved as if by magic!

The next step is to play your whistle along to the metronome as part of your practice regime. DON'T play tunes to it yet as you need to concentrate on just the beat. Instead of tunes just play scales to it (just the scale of D on a whistle) one note to each click up and down the scale. Use different speeds. Again, a few minutes of this every day and you will see a huge improvement on your timing.

By the way, your timing is not bad even now!

Author:  Adrian [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 12:24 am ]
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Blackhawk wrote:
I've been working on it, but it just sounds lifeless the way I play it, and I can't seem to put life into it the way you all do.


Several things to help you add emotion:

1) Don't just play sounds. Try to make each note sound as beautiful as your ability allows.

2) Use your imagination. Close your eyes and imagine you are playing in an idyllic scene or to a person you love.

3) Give freedom to your whole body to move a little to express your music. Standing or sitting ramrod stiff while playing will stifle the way a tune sounds.

4) If a tune has words then think of them as you play and try to express the feelings they invoke. I think you have discovered this already.

Author:  shadoes [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:24 am ]
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Adrian wrote:
Blackhawk wrote:
I've been working on it, but it just sounds lifeless the way I play it, and I can't seem to put life into it the way you all do.


Several things to help you add emotion:

1) Don't just play sounds. Try to make each note sound as beautiful as your ability allows.

2) Use your imagination. Close your eyes and imagine you are playing in an idyllic scene or to a person you love.

3) Give freedom to your whole body to move a little to express your music. Standing or sitting ramrod stiff while playing will stifle the way a tune sounds.

4) If a tune has words then think of them as you play and try to express the feelings they invoke. I think you have discovered this already.


When I play the whistle I try to treat it as much like my voice as possible. Meaning I think about how I would sing a line then try to play the whistle in that manner. Even if one does not think they are a good singer you can still imagine how you would sing the line. Just my two cents but really like everyone else I think you are being to hard and unjust to yourself.

Just relax and play my friend. It is there. :)

Author:  Adrian [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 10:21 am ]
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shadoes wrote:
When I play the whistle I try to treat it as much like my voice as possible. Meaning I think about how I would sing a line then try to play the whistle in that manner. Even if one does not think they are a good singer you can still imagine how you would sing line. Just my two cents but really like everyone else I think you are being to hard and unjust to yourself.

Just relax and play my friend. It is there. :)


Good tip Ed.

Author:  Blackhawk [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 10:45 am ]
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Thank you all! This is all stuff I need to be hearing and absorbing into my heart and my playing.

And Adrian, that's excellent about listening to the metronome each day to get a sense of rythm! I never would have thought of that.

Author:  jrc [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 10:51 am ]
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Blackhawk wrote:
Thank you all! This is all stuff I need to be hearing and absorbing into my heart and my playing.

And Adrian, that's excellent about listening to the metronome each day to get a sense of rythm! I never would have thought of that.


How 'bout tapping with the turn signal ... and you can get the family joining in.

It's a blast!

Author:  Adrian [ Sat Nov 03, 2007 3:06 pm ]
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jrc wrote:
How 'bout tapping with the turn signal ... and you can get the family joining in.


Too easy for YOU and YOUR family. One person should tap it as 4/4 another as 5/4 and another drum it as 7/8. That will be a lot more fun esp when you get the accents right.

Author:  Blackhawk [ Tue Nov 06, 2007 10:18 am ]
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jrc wrote:
I don't know if it works for you, but I almost ALWAYS record to a click track
I finally had some time yesterday to try this, and it was one of those life changing moments. I didn't take to it right away, still getting ahead of the clicks, or allowing too many clicks between my notes, but finally I got the hang of it, and oh man, I feel like I just got an O'Riordan in the mail! I'm not sure how best to adapt it to slow songs yet, but I recorded O the Deep, Deep Love of Jesus on two different whistles and it made all the difference in the world. I tried to record The Lord is My Shepherd, but haven't mastered the technique of continuing to blow as I wait for the next beat to tell me to change notes, so it came out very wooden and mechanical, but I think as I get used to it, I can use ornamentation (sliding from one note to the next, rolls, etc) to keep it from being too robotic. Adrian has been giving me advice in PMs, and I think that will help a lot, too. Man, I'm so excited! Thanks for all the advice, everyone!

Author:  jrc [ Tue Nov 06, 2007 10:21 am ]
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:thumbsup: =D> =D> =D> =D>

Glad it helped!!!

Now...

POST A TUNE MATE!!! :lol:

blessings brother!!

jrc

Author:  ConnieS [ Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:02 pm ]
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Guess what? Susan graced us with this tune on her new Dreamflute Bass before she left.

http://praisewhistlers.org/exchange/son ... _Susan.mp3

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