Praise Whistlers Abroad
http://praisewhistlers.org/forum/

Christmas 2007
http://praisewhistlers.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=2597
Page 2 of 12

Author:  jrc [ Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:48 pm ]
Post subject: 

Very nice, Judy - you and Ren have changed my view of dulcimers completely. I hear them in a whole new context.

Cool song, nicely played!!

jrc

Author:  Judy K [ Sun Nov 04, 2007 9:14 pm ]
Post subject: 

Thanks, jrc. :)

Ren, with his dulcimer playing for the '06 Christmas 'album', is entirely responsible for my interest in dulcimers. After hearing his playing I had to try it myself. Someday I hope to get close to his level of playing -- with practice, lots & lots of practice! 8)

Author:  ConnieS [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:49 pm ]
Post subject: 

Here's "Two French Carols" from Shan.

Right-click to download
Two French Carols

Author:  khl [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 7:04 pm ]
Post subject: 

ConnieS wrote:
Here's "Two French Carols" from Shan.

"Two French Carols" - Shan

Nice job, Shan. What's the second carol on the clip? It's vaguely familiar, but I can't name it. I also ask because now it's one I want to learn.

Author:  ConnieS [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 7:09 pm ]
Post subject: 

NIFTY, Shan! I like Bring A Torch, Jeanette Isabella. Like Keith, I'd like to know more about the second carol.

Author:  Judy K [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 7:20 pm ]
Post subject: 

Nice, Shan! Wish it was longer .... :)

Author:  Shan [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 7:21 pm ]
Post subject: 

khl wrote:
Nice job, Shan. What's the second carol on the clip? It's vaguely familiar, but I can't name it. I also ask because now it's one I want to learn.


Thank you! It's called Shepherds, Shake Off Your Drowsy Sleep. I heard it on a Christmas CD I bought at an Arts Fest at college by a local group called The Barolk Folk. They paired it with the Irish song Lord Inchiquin, which as far as I know has nothing to do with Christmas. But the two do sound lovely together. :)

Author:  jrc [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:17 pm ]
Post subject: 

Very nice ... what were you playing, or did you say that already? I missed it.

You guys all know some cool songs ... I envy your 'tune' vocabulary. Nice choice of songs and whistle Shan... very sweet.


jrc

Author:  Shan [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:23 pm ]
Post subject: 

jrc wrote:
Very nice ... what were you playing, or did you say that already? I missed it.


No-- you didn't miss it. I put it in the PM I sent Connie to tell her I'd posted the song and forgot to say it here. (sorry!) I used my susato Eb. It sounded most medieval-y to me, which seemed perfect for these songs.

Now I'm looking around for something to try to record with the borrowed low D, and my new Tommy-tweaked C. Will do if the right combination of song and whistle sound comes to mind. :)

Author:  Walden [ Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:23 pm ]
Post subject: 

The Cherry Tree Carol.
American folk tune.

Right-click to download
Cherry Tree Carol

Pipe and tabor.

C pipe made by Mack Hoover of wood and brass.

Image

Joy to the World.
Based on arr. by Lowell Mason, 19th C.

Right-click to downloadJoy to the world

Pipe and bell.

C pipe made by Mack Hoover of wood and brass.

Author:  Judy K [ Fri Nov 09, 2007 1:17 am ]
Post subject: 

I still can't figure out how you manage to get all those notes from just three holes. You're a talented fellow, Mr. Walden ..... :)

Author:  khl [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 12:33 am ]
Post subject: 

Here's my version of the Polish Carol "Infant Holy, Infant Lowly" played on a Resonance Low D:

Right-click to download
Infant Holy, Infant Lowly

I love this little tune.

Author:  Shan [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:12 am ]
Post subject: 

Wow, Walden - how you can carry on two different rhythms at the same time amazes me. I get confused just thinking about making each of my hands do something different at the same time, probably why I never learned how to play piano. Anyway, I love listening to how you accompany yourself. :)

Keith - I like this song, too, and I like the way you played it. I fiddled around with it a little bit and I don't think it ever came out sounding that clean and lyrical.

Author:  ConnieS [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:43 pm ]
Post subject: 

Some more links to the Christmas project:


Right-click to download
The First Noel - Shan


Right-click to download
O Come O Come Immanuel - jrc


Right-click to download
Joy To the World - Walden


Right-click to download
It Came Upon the Midnight Clear - Walden


Right-click to download
Infant Holy, Infant Lowly - Keith


Right-click to download
God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen - Walden

Author:  KittyR [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:14 pm ]
Post subject: 

I am very seriously trying to find the time to contribute a recording to this project.

Author:  ConnieS [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:37 pm ]
Post subject: 

Eh? Speak up, youngun'.

Author:  ConnieS [ Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:43 pm ]
Post subject: 

And by the way, Kitty, that's one very nice signature you've got there.

Quote:
"How to embrace the traditions of worship while rejecting the worship of traditions...
This is the next great question for the body of Christ in America."
~ Kitty Robbins, 2007

Author:  Adrian [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 5:14 am ]
Post subject: 

ConnieS wrote:


Shan
I love the mellow sound of your whistle. Very well played and with nice ornamentation. I liked your variations and I learned something new from you.

Jim
Wonderful as ever. Susan and I particularly enjoy your meditative playing and are seriously still waiting for you to produce a CD.

Aaron
You troubadour you! Do you busk? The bell was a great idea.

Keith
What a whistle! Super rich tone and I'd love to hear it in a cathedral. What was the high pitch squeaky noise (might be my computer though). Very well played sir. I think you play the low whistles particularly well. You have got your ornamentation well polished now.

Author:  jrc [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:03 pm ]
Post subject: 

Adrian wrote:
ConnieS wrote:


Shan
I love the mellow sound of your whistle. Very well played and with nice ornamentation. I liked your variations and I learned something new from you.

Jim
Wonderful as ever. Susan and I particularly enjoy your meditative playing and are seriously still waiting for you to produce a CD.

Aaron
You troubadour you! Do you busk? The bell was a great idea.

Keith
What a whistle! Super rich tone and I'd love to hear it in a cathedral. What was the high pitch squeaky noise (might be my computer though). Very well played sir. I think you play the low whistles particularly well. You have got your ornamentation well polished now.


Agreed ... all nice arrangements, well played.



Quote:
Do you busk?


:shock: :-k

I like them all except that jrc guy ... someone please check and be sure he's blowing on the right end of the whistle?

Author:  jrc [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 2:04 pm ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. Those engaging in this practice are called buskers. Busking is a British term used in many areas of the English-speaking world. In the United States they are more often called street performers or street musicians.


Now I got it ... I had no idea. Gotta love Wikipedia.

Edit: I should add, at first I was quite confused:

Quote:
A busk (also spelled busque) is the rigid element of a corset placed at the centre front.


It's better now.

Author:  Ren-Tin-10 [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 4:57 pm ]
Post subject: 

From Henrik Norbeck's Swedish Traditional Music Site:

Quote:
A typical small festival is the spelmansstämma, plural spelmansstämmor (which means something like "musicians meeting"). Most places in Sweden have one of these meetings once a year. Some of the meetings are small, some (e.g. the one in Bingsjö in the beginning of July) are very big with thousands of people arriving in for one or more days and nights of dancing, playing, listening and having a generally good time. During the summer these meetings are usually held outdoors. At these meetings you often find a lot of people playing together in small groups (informal sessions). This is called buskspel (playing in the bushes) in Swedish.


Could this have been the origin of the term? :idea:

Author:  Shan [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 5:50 pm ]
Post subject: 

Adrian wrote:
Shan
I love the mellow sound of your whistle.


Actually, it's Don's Dixon low D on loan, though I must admit, I'm beginning to feel very possessive about it. :-$ I've come a long way in a week with that piper's grip! Though every once in awhile I'll pick it up and not be able to get a thing out at first.

Adrian wrote:
I liked your variations and I learned something new from you.


YOU learned something from ME? :-s Like, what not to do? No, don't tell me-- I'll just pretend it was something good, and congratulate you on being an astute learner! :lol:

(You'd think after my big pep talk to Blackhawk that I wouldn't be shy about posting... but I have to purposely NOT listen to anything anyone posts until AFTER I post whatever I'm working on, or I completely chicken out. :roll:)

Author:  Adrian [ Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:44 pm ]
Post subject: 

Ren-Tin-10 wrote:
From Henrik Norbeck's Swedish Traditional Music Site:

Quote:
A typical small festival is the spelmansstämma, plural spelmansstämmor (which means something like "musicians meeting"). Most places in Sweden have one of these meetings once a year. Some of the meetings are small, some (e.g. the one in Bingsjö in the beginning of July) are very big with thousands of people arriving in for one or more days and nights of dancing, playing, listening and having a generally good time. During the summer these meetings are usually held outdoors. At these meetings you often find a lot of people playing together in small groups (informal sessions). This is called buskspel (playing in the bushes) in Swedish.


Could this have been the origin of the term? :idea:


Very interesting. This may indeed be the root of the word. We have many many Viking words in our vocabulary. Vikings invaded and raided Britain for 300 years or so until they were defeated by one of our Christian kings, Alfred the Great, who also decreed that their was plenty of room for them as well. Alfred the Great (the only king we have that was called ' the Great') gave half of England to the Danes to settle in: a line was drawn from the Thames River to the Roman Watling Street. No one was allowed across this line except to trade. This act saved Britain from becoming a Nordic country and us all speaking Danish.

Fortunately the Vikings, unlike the English in the south, were not keen on the written word, books or libraries apart from burning them! If they had been they would have had an even greater impact on the English language. Nevertheless they did contribute about 200 words to English e.g. smile, trust, knife, happy, egg, sister, ransack, sky, hit, tarn, beck, mire, dale, cake, peak, pike, scare (ask Susan for others).


Ah - Susan has just woken up and says that busk come to us from old French who themselves borrowed it from a Germanic source. Still could be a Viking word ;) Lots of Vikings settled in France including the Normans (Northmen). These Normans (Vikings) invaded us in 1066 and gave us more words but this time Norman French. Ooops I think I have waffled on. :oops:

Author:  Adrian [ Wed Nov 14, 2007 12:08 am ]
Post subject: 

Shan wrote:
Adrian wrote:
Shan
I love the mellow sound of your whistle.


Actually, it's Don's Dixon low D on loan, though I must admit, I'm beginning to feel very possessive about it. :-$ I've come a long way in a week with that piper's grip! Though every once in awhile I'll pick it up and not be able to get a thing out at first.


You are doing great with it and it has a much better sound than I thought Dixons had. Do you think you will buy one (or steal that one)?

Quote:
Adrian wrote:
I liked your variations and I learned something new from you.


YOU learned something from ME? :-s Like, what not to do? No, don't tell me-- I'll just pretend it was something good, and congratulate you on being an astute learner! :lol:


I'll PM you on this.

Quote:
(You'd think after my big pep talk to Blackhawk that I wouldn't be shy about posting... but I have to purposely NOT listen to anything anyone posts until AFTER I post whatever I'm working on, or I completely chicken out. :roll:)


Here again I should learn from you. If I listen to the clips from others first I'm usually intimidated and feel it is not worth recording something. I have to remind myself every time that TPE is not about performance but about giving your best you can and trying to improve your playing in the process. Few things are as helpful in self-improvement as listening to recordings of yourself. In future I think I'll record first and listen to others later. Thanks for the tip.

Author:  jrc [ Wed Nov 14, 2007 7:31 am ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
I have to purposely NOT listen to anything anyone posts until AFTER I post whatever I'm working on, or I completely chicken out.


We are less without you ... please post recordings if you have the capability. You never know what you have to offer at any given time, or what revelation you may afford someone else.

No'chickening-out' allowed - PWA rules?

Page 2 of 12 All times are UTC - 6 hours
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/