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 Post subject: Tabulature
PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 4:20 pm 
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Location: North of Houston,Tx
I like that song 4 is in whistle tab, much easier to start working with it than having to tab it out myself first. I am trying to learn to read music but just can't get past the mental blocks sometimes. I know Mark has said he can tab out songs if he gets a copy of the music, maybe he could help with that if he is given a little time, and of course if others think it would help them. Just a thought, not trying to take the lazy wasy out.

Peace,
Micheal


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 6:50 pm 
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I personally prefer music without TAB. It wastes ink when printing and I don't need the TAB. I learned to read music for the D whistle and that is all I need to learn a new tune.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 6:58 pm 
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I would seriously suggest making the effort to learn to read the music itself. In the long run you will find it pays off more as it will open you up to more oppurtunities to play. Start with the good ol' standard nmenocic phrases for the lines (e)very (g)ood (b)oy (d)oes (f)ine and the spaces on the treble clef spell F A C E. Drill those a few times each day and before you know it you will find you can read the staff much better. Take 5 or ten minutes to drill the lines and spaces and just remember that those patterns repeat themselves above or below the staff lines.

If someone wants to tab the songs posted please do. If you will send me the file I will even post it. But for the songs I post the format will remain the same. If someone wishes to work with me and provide tabs then get in touch with me and we can figure it out.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:04 pm 
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I started learning to play whistle a little under two years ago. The tablature was helpful to me to begin with and then I found myself using it less and less and finally being able to play from notes alone.

Oh, and it really does help to start with tunes you know already and have music for -- hymns for instance. And soon you may find you're able to pick things up by ear.

Best wishes.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:55 pm 
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.I would recommand acquiring and studying some fakebooks. Fakebooks are collections of sheet music that contains only the melody line and backing chords and, where applicable, the lyrics.

If you do so, get the ones that are written for "C" instruments. I believe (and please set me straight if I'm all wet on this) that all whistles, regardless of key, are considered to be "C" instruments, in the sense that the player selects the instrument based on the key of the sheet music, rather than vice versa.

Hopefully this helps.

-Brasso

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 3:23 am 
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Micheal, I downloaded a penny whistle tabulature by David Armstrong, when I first started playing -- even though I have been able to read music most of my life. If I can remember how to use it, I'd be glad to put tabs on any song you like.

:)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:01 am 
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I transpose all tunes to D or G. These can be played on a key of D whistle. Then if I want to play in the Key of C or F, I use a key of C whistle using the exact same fingering that I learned on the key of D whistle. That way I only have to learn one fingering for the notes.

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This is the day which the Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 9:44 am 
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Location: North of Houston,Tx
Judy, I have a whistle font that lets me print out tab, and when I am learning a song I do make my own tabs to give me a visual map of what my fingers need to do.

My problem is that it is a slow process for me, I have known the notes (Every Good Boy Does Fine.....F....A....C....E) since I was in elementary school. But when I look at the dots on the staff my mind just does not get it. And as far as transposing keys goes, I have never understood that at all, not in the transcription sense.

So I do make my own tabs, make changes as I learn to play the tune, use my ear a lot and just try and find the way to make the song sound the way it is supposed to.

I started this thread thinking that there might be others out there that struggle with this in their own way. I get by with a good ear and tabs to get me started. I also play guitar and dulcimer and music for them doesn't make sense either, so I use tabs for them or video resources when I can find them. I can watch someone else playing and pick things up easily.

So again, I was not trying to take an easy way out. If anyone has any good suggestions that might be the magic key that unlocks this mystery for me, I am willing to listen. Those dots and their meanings just confuse me.

Peace,
Micheal


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 10:12 am 
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try this. get a blank peice of staff paper... print on out..draw it.. doesn't really matter. Just a line of staff :) find a note you know every time you see it.. say G.... write a g note ... then just write few more notes along the staff within one line of G.. use both the line and the space. Then go back and write the note names saying them aloud to help you brain make the visual connection to that note name. OR if you want to play something you know..grab the music to amazing grace... print it out... write the notes below the staff... not the tab just th name of the note. Play it.. play it till you are sick of it but pay close attention to the notes as you play. Unfortu natly I am not sure there is a magic key to learning the notes other than just drilling them. Set yourself a time frame... say three weeks that you will dedicate to giving 10 minutes a day to note name drills. Try this with songs you know first. Songs you will know if they are wrong.

It is difficult. When I started th whistle I tried the whistle tab but quickly fell back to just the music. But then I could already read it. But I remember how hard it was and sometimes still is when i try to sight read new stuff. Just take it slow and it will come. I wish I had the magic bullet :) I really do. but I haven't found one yet.


Some of you folks that teach music chime in and let us know how you approach it from a teaching standpoint :)


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 1:18 pm 
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1. I start with music and tab together. I have peope write the letters above the notation so they learn to go "F-A-C--oh, that's C." And then they write in a C above the tab, which is typed in above the notation.

2. Then after a couple of months I take away the tab and they can still write in the letters. Only the more they write the letters the quicker they are at figuring out what the letters are.

3. Then I eventually don't let them write the letters one day. After much moaning and groaning, they take the new piece home, and play through it at whatever snail pace it takes them to get through the piece and learn it. Then they come back to class with some ability to play the piece. At that point, it's just a matter of doing it. The more they do it, the better they get. So I'm not opposed to the tab, it's just that at some point you have to "Just Do It."

But the tab does help at first--just for practice, not forever.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 8:03 pm 
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I suggest learning the abc musical notation language, or at least, learn to read music in the treble cleff with either one or two sharps and use one of the abc to dots programs, or, for ear training, use an abc to midi program.

After I learned to sight read treble cleff one or 2 sharps, I found myself associating the note placement with finger placement rather than the note "names". OTOH, transcribing a tune is really difficult for me as I neet to stop and say that fingering is (do, re, me, fa, let's see... that's an A in the lower octave. Our harper in the band can scratch out a tune on paper with no problems. I wish she would learn ABC so I could play it and learn it by ear.

Ain't technology wonderful?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 10:28 pm 
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I provide the tablature on Whistle and Squeak because some folks don't know how to read music, or it is a laborious process. I think that having the tab helps folks make the transition from fingerings to being able to read music, which would be the ultimate goal.

The process that I created for making sheet music with tab was originally for a short-term mission to the Navajo Nation, teaching whistle to kids during a week-long VBS program.

I'd be happy to do tablature for folks on songs or hymns, since I'd take the result and post them on Whistle and Squeak.

My one caveat: I can't promise any deadlines due to my work schedule. However, it would be a joy to help some folks and post some new music at the same time.

Please PM me if interested. (I get e-mail notification of PM's, but it might be a week before I get around to checking the board otherwise)

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Whistle and Squeak: Folk, Traditional, Hymns, and Carols with Pennywhistle Tablature and Sound Files


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 12:24 am 
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Micheal wrote:
So again, I was not trying to take an easy way out. If anyone has any good suggestions that might be the magic key that unlocks this mystery for me, I am willing to listen. Those dots and their meanings just confuse me.

Peace,
Micheal


I can play well by ear but reading music was not something I felt I could learn. Several things helped me change that about 5 years ago.

1. For about three weeks I went through four or five pages of music a day speaking out loud the names of the notes one after another. Once I could recognise them I tried to do it as fast as possible. This was not easy for me but it worked.

2. I then worked hard on note lengths using clapping and foot tapping. Each day I worked through music of songs I did not know so that there could not be any cheating. I did this for about a month.

3. At last I put it together and began to play easy tunes that I did not know (at first from old hymn books) and to this day I try to add sight reading to my daily practice regime.

This may not be the best approach but it worked for me and it was definitely worth mastering.

One of the MAIN KEYS to learning to sight read is to practice practice practice and DON'T practice mistakes. If you are sight-reading a piece and you get stuck or confused then you are PLAYING TOO FAST! Slow down until you can play the notes correctly even if that is just one note a second. At that speed there is nothing you cannot play and this is the key to playing something correctly at speed - learn it first correctly at a manageable speed.

As for note lengths there is no substitute when you are learning for actually counting the music out note by note. If you are consistent with this then eventually you will start to recognise groups of note as having a particular sound just like when we start to read as a child we learn to recognise groups of letters as a sound. It's worth persevering IMO.


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