Praise Whistlers Abroad
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Improvisation
http://praisewhistlers.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=106
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Author:  Adrian [ Fri Feb 17, 2006 6:50 am ]
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ConnieS wrote:
Or an easy way for a whistler to think of thirds is to play an alphabet game with "every other letter." D F A C E G B That's just every other note. Every other note is thirds. So a third above the melody would just be--if the melody note is D, then you play F at the same time. If the melody moves up to E, then you play G at the same time. When I get new students, I start them out with alphabet cards--but the cards only go through G. I get them to lay the cards out A to G, then emphasise that the next letter in the MUSIC alphabet is A -- not H. A to B to C is seconds. Then we start working on thirds. They put down an A and C an E and G -- then instead of I, the third above G is B -- they skipped the A to get there.

When we play those bouncy Irish jigs, we do a lot of thirds--skipping every other hole. Those are MELODIC thirds, where they're played one after the other. When you take the A someone else is playing and play C simultaneously, it's a HARMONIC third -- you're playing the harmony. If that muddied the water, I'll try again. Please let me know. It's really more simple than it sometimes sounds. :|


Connie

I assume when you refer to F and C F# and C#. Do you just find it easier to drop the concept of sharps when teaching with a D whistle. I wasn't sure.

In my answer to the question about what exactly is a 3rd I was explaining what the musical interval "a 3rd" meant (both major and minor). Of course that was not really the question meant. Rather the question meant, "what does a 3rd mean when shadowing a melody. Thankfully Connie has given the easy answer. It is simply the third note up the SCALE regardless of whether the interval is major or minor.

Get your partner (or record on your tape recorder) a slow D scale. Then play along to it but start on F# and shadow it note for note. You will hear the harmonic effect. Now try the same but start on A (a 5th) for the other harmonic line.

Thank you Connie.

Author:  markbell [ Sat Feb 18, 2006 9:36 am ]
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Robbie wrote:
Adrian wrote:
Quote:
It is very helpful to be able to recognise and reproduce the different musical intervals by ear. The easy way to learn this is to know the interval in a song. For example: If you want a major 3rd sing the the first two notes in 'Morning has broken'. [A useful phrase as the third note gives you a perfect 5th and the fourth note gives you the octave].


Another way is to listen to old Beach Boys songs. :lol:


Oh, Robbie! How I've missed your unique take on things! btw, how's the accordion fascination going?

:mrgreen:

Author:  ConnieS [ Sat Feb 18, 2006 3:30 pm ]
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Adrian wrote:
I assume when you refer to F and C F# and C#. Do you just find it easier to drop the concept of sharps when teaching with a D whistle. I wasn't sure.



Well, you've got me there. I started whistle in the fall and just now started scales with the students, so I've just introduced them to the fact that their Fs and Cs are sharps. Back then they weren't ready for scales, and introducing sharps and flats was producing confused looks. I just dropped the term for a while, and now that I've re-introduced them, they're understanding a lot more. Unfortunately, I'm no longer in the habit of calling a sharp a sharp. :oops: Well, better to flub up in front of you guys than in front of the students.

Oh, and thanks for the continued mode work.

Author:  Adrian [ Sun Feb 19, 2006 2:17 am ]
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ConnieS wrote:
Adrian wrote:
I assume when you refer to F and C F# and C#. Do you just find it easier to drop the concept of sharps when teaching with a D whistle. I wasn't sure.



Well, you've got me there. I started whistle in the fall and just now started scales with the students, so I've just introduced them to the fact that their Fs and Cs are sharps. Back then they weren't ready for scales, and introducing sharps and flats was producing confused looks. I just dropped the term for a while, and now that I've re-introduced them, they're understanding a lot more. Unfortunately, I'm no longer in the habit of calling a sharp a sharp. :oops: Well, better to flub up in front of you guys than in front of the students.

Oh, and thanks for the continued mode work.


Connie

It makes sense. The concept of sharps and flats can wait for beginner students.

I'm no expert on any aspect of music. I just try to pass on the little i have learnt or am learning. I have gleaned a lot from others on PWA and C&F there are some real experts on both.

Author:  idawhoa [ Mon Mar 13, 2006 8:13 am ]
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Thread on similar topic:

http://chiffboard.mati.ca/viewtopic.php?p=489624#489624

Author:  Micheal [ Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:43 pm ]
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Connie....per Tommy's suggestion I resurrected this from the ashes for you so it now appears on the first page.

Peace,
Micheal

Author:  ConnieS [ Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:46 pm ]
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Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Author:  Jim Wright [ Thu Jan 04, 2007 10:19 pm ]
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Improv is a bit tricky ... you pick up the whistle and start to play .... if it sounds good and you are asked what song you are playing ....you tell them it is improv.. and if it sounds terrible .. you tell them you were just blowing the spit out of your whistle. :roll: :D

Author:  Tommy [ Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:27 pm ]
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Micheal wrote:
Connie....per Tommy's suggestion I resurrected this from the ashes for you so it now appears on the first page.

Peace,
Micheal


Excellent improvisation Micheal. ;)

Author:  Adrian [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 1:00 am ]
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Jim Wright wrote:
Improv is a bit tricky ... you pick up the whistle and start to play .... if it sounds good and you are asked what song you are playing ....you tell them it is improv.. and if it sounds terrible .. you tell them you were just blowing the spit out of your whistle. :roll: :D


That's the way! You're learning well.

Author:  fancypiper [in Heaven] [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 8:44 am ]
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Jim Wright wrote:
and if it sounds terrible .. you tell them you were just blowing the spit out of your whistle. :roll: :D

That isn't spit, it's music juice!

Author:  Jim Wright [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:05 am ]
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fancypiper wrote:
Jim Wright wrote:
and if it sounds terrible .. you tell them you were just blowing the spit out of your whistle. :roll: :D

That isn't spit, it's music juice!

Could be .. could be ...but when I fling it about my daughters still say, "Yuck ... that is gross!"" :D

Author:  Blackhawk [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:56 am ]
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Adrian wrote:
Jim Wright wrote:
Improv is a bit tricky ... you pick up the whistle and start to play .... if it sounds good and you are asked what song you are playing ....you tell them it is improv.. and if it sounds terrible .. you tell them you were just blowing the spit out of your whistle. :roll: :D


That's the way! You're learning well.
Adrian, your new avatar makes me thirsty!

Author:  Revles [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 11:22 am ]
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I tell folk that all my mistakes are improvisation...some even believe me.....Les.

Author:  Adrian [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:25 pm ]
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Revles wrote:
I tell folk that all my mistakes are improvisation...some even believe me.....Les.


Unconscious and unplanned improvisation! ;)

Author:  foothillsOH [ Fri Jan 05, 2007 1:58 pm ]
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I just wanted to let you know Adrian that this thread has been very helpful.

Thanks

I have it all written down on index cards.

Should have clipped and pasted it.

I have discovered however, If I write it down, I usually retain it better.

Great Thread!

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