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colloquialisms
http://praisewhistlers.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=18282
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Author:  mack [ Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:03 pm ]
Post subject:  colloquialisms

Taking of in a new thread inspired by HOLLER.
When my buddy from Missouri and I got out of the navy we borrowed a car and made the round trip from Norfolk to Colorado (my place) and took hundreds of slides of many spots with a borrowed camera along the way. Jerry settled in Norfolk and I went to college in Massachusetts where I met Joan. Three years later in 63 Joan and I followed some of the same roads to Greeley where I finished college. Had no camera for that, just memories. We did own the 55 VW bug though.

That trip with Jerry we drove through a holler in West Virginia. It was so quaint and beautiful and peaceful in the summer of 1960. We passed a covered wooden bridge that was closed to cars and we looked across the Cheat River at smoke rising from a crooked chimney of a primitive cabin. I hope that ain't changed!

Author:  Judy K [ Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:37 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

I'm not sure where the NWS got holler. Most people round these parts say 'holla'. :mrgreen:

Mack, WV is just as beautiful now as back in 1960. One trip with a now ex SIL took us passed a river (or creek/crick 8) ) with a nifty little roller dam for a mill. On the same trip we went passed the house where Pearl Buck was born. (Not a name that will stand out for many, but my momma raised us to read anything & everything she had in our house.) This same trip started at our house in southern Ohio on a day late in May, temperature at home in the 70's. The point of the journey was a farm, located between 2 ski resorts on WV's eastern side, which had had 6" of snow that morning. WV is a great state for adventures.

Author:  mack [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:40 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

I read "The Good Earth" sometime in my lifetime. Only snippets stick in my memory. Pearl S Buck
S is for Sydenstricker
It reminds me of my first grade music teacher's name- Gertrude Knockenschneider. She changed it to Bonecutter. That was supposed to be more American I think. We were at war with Germany. I learned how to draw a treble cleft and Every Good Boy Does Fine and do re mi etc. And that Robert was tone deaf and I wasn't. I was cross eyed and he wasn't. We all have our crosses to bear.

We lived in Kansas then. After the war we moved back to Colorado. My grandpa, Kansas born and bred, once said "Colorado would be a nice place if they'd flatten it out some". I always thought Kansas could use more ups and downs and less horizontal snow. My other grandpa married the daughter of a Colorado homesteader. She and her folks and numerous sibs lived in a dugout in a hillside with rock walls a dirt floor and a sod roof.

Author:  jrc [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:10 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

mack wrote:

That trip with Jerry we drove through a holler in West Virginia. It was so quaint and beautiful and peaceful in the summer of 1960. We passed a covered wooden bridge that was closed to cars and we looked across the Cheat River at smoke rising from a crooked chimney of a primitive cabin. I hope that ain't changed!


Is this the bridge?

Author:  mack [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:25 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

I remember it as being one lane and pretty weather worn. Could be mixing memories of New England...
That was certainly like the narrow valley we drove through.

Author:  ConnieS [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:38 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

I grew up with hollers. On the rare snow days in Tennessee we would sled down into one and climb back out. Didn’t have all these nice snow clothes, just layered up as best we could. We would get so cold we couldn’t stand it any more, would go in and warm up by the coal stove.

Anybody else remember that process you went through? Numb to extremely painful (whimpering by the coal stove), to a little pained to mostly comforted. Then we’d head back outside to sled back down into the holler.

No, outsiders couldn’t call it a holler. That would just be patronizing.

Author:  mack [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:59 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

Out here we have draws and washes, ravines and canyons. Holler is what you do to communicate across the draw or up the canyon or down into the ravine or into a hollow cave.
Mom used to holler at us but we didn't dare holler back unless it was "I'm coming".

And we have valleys. We live in the Grand Valley. Grand is the former name of the Colorado river. There still is a Grand River; it is a fork of the Colorado. Valleys are wide and mostly dry but for a strip of green along the stream usually toward the middle. When streams come together it's a confluence and one is the fork, usually prefixed with a compass direction, or a settler's name. Most of our rivers you can wade or step across before all the forks add their contributions.

What is two hollers coming together called? It isn't a trick question. I just want to know.

Author:  mack [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:11 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

We knew cold and snow and wood stoves and wondering if we would ever be warm again. And breaking trail to the bathroom.
Why I remember one time...

Author:  Judy K [ Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:57 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

mack wrote:
We knew cold and snow and wood stoves and wondering if we would ever be warm again. And breaking trail to the bathroom.
Why I remember one time...

First heat sources I remember was a heating oil stove in the kitchen and a coal & wood fireplace in the living room. Breaking trail to the 'bathroom' was a definite until after I turned 9, although 'baths' were in the kitchen next to the stove. Seems a # 3 washtub was usually included in the mix.

Fancy snow gear was never seen. Layers upon layers of clothes. Sledding was always down to our garden or my grandpa's barn. Our houses (grandparents next door) were high on the ridge. Everything else -- gardens, barns, and such -- were the next flat down. Then, a couple of flats lower, came our holler where Grandpa farmed 3 fields and a moonshiner held sway in the far corner.

Author:  ConnieS [ Thu Jan 11, 2018 6:12 am ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

I really don’t know what is is when two hollers come together. Our holler was where a hill had been flattened down to build our neighbor’s house, and then you went down what was left of it to go up another hill to get to out house. Between our houses was the start of the holler. It went on into the horse pasture. I never had much to do with that, unless I’d borrowed a bridle and wanted to try my hand at catching a pony. You could ride ‘em bareback if you could catch them.

A truck would come and dump a load of coal every couple of years. One of my daily chores was to go fill a coal bucket and bring it up to the house. We had electricity and running water, but the coal stove was warmer than space heaters.

We had a bathtub. It had legs with claws.

We were country when country wasn’t cool.

Author:  jrc [ Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

Quote:
We were country when country wasn’t cool.


It was always cool ... just took the world a while to catch up. :mrgreen: :thumbsup:

Author:  Judy K [ Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:47 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: colloquialisms

We always had electricity. Running water depended on how fast the kid carrying the bucket was, until around 1962. My grandparents that lived next door had running water all my life and one of those nifty claw foot tubs. Loved that tub!

We didn't have a phone until 1959. Wouldn't that blow the minds of today's teenagers?

Our family had moved into my great-grandparents' house, who refused to have any of those new fangled inventions to be installed. Took a bit for Dad to 'catch up' with what needed done.

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